Riders of the Lone Star

| April 10, 2017

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The year is 1852 and a handful of settlers work to carve out an existence on the Texas frontier. It is a harsh life, where families are at the mercy of hostile Comanche and vicious outlaws, and the only ones holding the line between life and death are a few brave men, known as Texas Rangers. These men, outnumbered and outgunned, patrolled thousands of square miles, in an effort to bring law and order to the untamed land. They faced impossible odds with nothing more than grit, determination, and a fast gun. Sixteen year old Jesse “Heck” Carson leaves his comfortable home to join the fight, and in the process realizes the life of adventure he seeks comes at a price, the cost of which is hardship, danger, and possibly his own life. The bonds of friendship, loyalty, and duty will lead him into epic battles that will test both his courage and resolve. Along the way he learns what it means to wear the star of the Texas Rangers. Riders of the Lone Star is a classic western novel that includes all of the elements that fans of the genre have come to expect, but with a few surprises along the way. It is a tale of bravery, sacrifice, and commitment to duty in the face of overwhelming odds, and will remind readers why the western novel is such a beloved American art form. Riders of the Lone Star pays tribute to the men and women who shaped the history and legends of Texas.

Excerpts:
As fast as he could, he pulled the hammer back and fired, the first Comanche jerked once and hit the ground. The other warrior was no more than two feet away now. Heck wondered if he had another bullet left. Had he fired five or six shots? He couldn’t remember. Saying a silent prayer, Heck pulled the hammer back and looked at his approaching enemy. The point of the warrior’s lance was inches away from his chest when heck pulled the trigger. The barrel of the Walker was almost touching the chest of the charging Indian. Heck heard no sound, but saw the smoke pour out of the barrel and the big warrior dropped to his knees, and fell on top of the young Ranger.

Lieutenant Sutter and Corporal Anderson approached the men on horseback, ready to do what had to be done. Looking at the group of riders, however, Sutter immediately recognized he had made a terrible mistake. These men were not military, not even by Southern standards. They were unkempt, filthy, and armed to the teeth. His heart sank as he noticed that most of the detachment were Mexican and their guns were not in their holsters. “What is going on here?” he said, unable to believe what he was seeing.
The lead rider smiled and said, “This was even easier than Senor Cortina said it would be. Thank you.” Without saying another word, the man raised his pistol and fired two quick shots, hitting both Lieutenant Sutter and Corporal Anderson between the eyes.

The man wheeled around with his rifle as Heck landed on his back, but it was a fruitless gesture. There was a look of pained surprise on the man’s face as Heck covered his mouth and pulled him to the floor. Heck plunged his knife into the man’s chest several times, as he kept his hand over the man’s mouth. After several seconds his muffled cries were silent.

John Spiars is the author of Riders of the Lone Star and Hell and Half of Texas, and is both a writer and amateur historian with a passion for the history and myths of the “Old West”. His dream is to keep alive the western genre for the this generation and all of those to come, while both entertaining and educating readers of all ages. He is a native Texan, and lives in North Texas with his wife, four children, and two dogs. When not writing western novels he maintains a blog about Texas history and travel called Under the Lone Star.

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