Author interview with Narcisse Nguema of ‘About Black Women, My Grandmother Told Me’

| August 20, 2019

Author interview with Narcisse Nguema of ‘About Black Women, My Grandmother Told Me’

Ranging from self-image to finances to women in society to food, there are few subjects not discussed in the book, “About Black Women, My Grandmother Told Me: Worthy Advice for Future Generations”. Intended for African American women, this book shares wisdom from a grandmother to both her children, grandchildren and beyond.

 

Looking for a touch of wisdom? Share the advice from Narcisse Nguema’s grandmother, recounted by Narcisse in his book ‘About Black Women, My Grandmother Told Me’. Narcisse, what inspired you to document the words of your grandmother in a book?

Bear through the beginning and pay attention. The author explaining the ties between his parents, and grandparents, as well as the presence of the Fang population, sets the tone for a lot of cultural information that follows. I was also super pleased to have Kindle’s insight handy as it had me looking up many words, thank you, Mr. Nguema, for expanding my vocabulary!

 

Aside from the particulars mentioned above, the book reads through as a touching remembrance to a woman who seems to have had the answers for everything but was humble enough to share her knowledge through stories rather than scolding. There are many insights that might surprise, or ‘trigger’ some readers. Basically, if you’re sensitive about “PC” talk, know that those sensitivities will cause you to miss out on a ton of obviously useful wisdom. I loved what was said in the section titled “A Young Woman Who Enjoys the Hip Life.”

 

Honestly, I have nothing but fantastic things to say about this book. It’s a collection of lessons on morals, with insight into real-world application. It guides the reader to embrace moderation rather than to avoid things, which are harmful and only accept things, which are good. It’s practical and presented in a respectful way.

 

Can you tell us about the life experiences that you used when you wrote this book?

Going back to my statement in the Foreword, you could have read this: ‘I had a reflective moral shock. It lasted between my late tenths and my early twenties. I realize, through years of societies observation, that most women, more than men, love the easiness; most of the institutions reward vicious people over virtuous ones, that they chase when sincere people stick on the truth; the abnormal has become praised and encouraged, hidden by a long tradition of social hypocrisy and religion enthusiasm. This manifesto is a pointer of conclusions made from the observation of the society under fragments of grandma’s alerts, upon man and woman I have gathered most of the ideas and quotes she was emphasizing throughout our childhood…’

 

What was the most important advice from your grandmother than you wanted to share in your book?

The advice in this book ranges from self-image to finances to women in society to food. There are few subjects not discussed in this book. However, as I mentioned earlier, the target audience for this book is for African American women, so some of the areas of this book do not apply to others.

 

What did you learn from pulling all of these wide-ranging topics neatly into a single book?

Aside from the particulars mentioned above, the book reads through as a touching remembrance to a woman who seems to have had the answers for everything but was humble enough to share her knowledge through stories rather than scolding.

 

Do you think that the subject matter of your book will have a bigger impact in the future or is it very much of our time?

Absolutely. The morals to keep by the siblings are as constant as the society itself.

 

Do you feel there are people in society who might not benefit from this book, and therefore shouldn’t read it?

Any age, anybody who needs to be reminded what is doable to improve the family and society conducts.

 

Do you think about these readers as you write? Or do you think about something else as you’re tapping away on your keyboard?

I empty my mind, while bringing an idea. I wake up multiple times between the sleep and the awakeness to empty what my thought has found about my project I am writing and to not miss any slice of original thought.

 

Where did you learn how to turn these original thoughts into a crafted written piece?

Writing came over time at an early age. I wanted to express myself and the only way I found was to tell the narrative without fear was to write it in my loneliness.

 

How has your writing and voice changed as you’ve kept writing?

I postponed my first write because I felt my juvenile voice too raw even in French. I learned how to get around the corners, staying raw and keeping the funny juvenile voice while aiming to improve society.

 

Have you started to think about how you can build an author brand around your unique voice?

Anybody can write a book or articles, but in my experience, on really become a writer one He or she faces his or her mistakes, once the writer learns how to correct himself and developed from that a distinguishable style. From that moment, the writer writ bar a taste.

 

Another thing to do is being receptive to critics, but listening to the most to the inner voice, your own stories teller. There is what you’ve learned in school and how you implement and adapt it in society as an original voice. Then maybe you become a brand.

 

What advice have you received from the critics while working on this book?

To not publish this book was rough to hear.

 

Despite that advice you’ve still published a book that has been very well received. Is this the last book that you intend to publish, or can you tell us a little bit about new writing projects you’re working on?

A French novel I should have published 10 years ago, and some law Book and articles. I am shared between law, literary imagination and the care of women readjustment. About Black Women, might not be my last book referring to their tribute as the core of the society.

 

Good luck with your upcoming French novel. Narcisse, I wish you the best of luck getting it finished, and I hope that readers love it as much as they love this book.

Excited to read the book we discussed today? Find it here on Amazon: ‘About Black Women, My Grandmother Told Me ( ASIN: B07SCTF4W1 )‘.

Want to find out more about Narcisse Nguema? Connect here!

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