A FATAL END an absolutely gripping classic British whodunnit (Wilson and McLeish Mysteries Book 7)

INTRODUCING A CLASSIC BRITISH WHODUNNIT FEATURING SCOTTISH DETECTIVE JOHN McLEISH AND SPARKY CIVIL SERVANT FRANCESCA WILSON.

‘A mastery worthy of P.D. James’ warm heart and cold eye.’ Kirkus

A troubled young girl is found dead in the bath at a party attended by John McLeish and Francesca Wilson.

The victim is Catriona Roberts, a pupil at the prestigious Faraday Foundation school for the musically gifted. But Catriona was not gifted. She was an outsider.

There is no shortage of suspects. Catriona’s complex relationships give McLeish plenty of leads, and he finds himself looking to the school for answers.

The Faraday Foundation is a hotbed of ongoing feuds and love trysts between staff and pupils. The deeper McLeish digs, the more scandal he unearths.

In this prestigious school of academic excellence someone also has a talent for murder. Now McLeish must use his expertise to reveal the killer — before anyone else meets their fatal end.

Fans of P.D. James, Robert Galbraith, Ngaio Marsh and Agatha Christie will devour this classic crime series full of twists.

Please note this was previously published as O Gentle Death.

***A FATAL BLOW, JANET NEEL’S FIRST WILSON AND McLEISH BOOK, WAS WINNER OF THE JOHN CREASY NEW BLOOD DAGGER 1988***

PRAISE FOR JANET NEEL’S WILSON AND McLEISH SERIES:

‘An outstandingly good first novel.’ Times Literary Supplement

‘A stylish debut by a literate and witty writer.’ Washington Post

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ ‘Ten Stars.’ Christine S

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ ‘Fascinating stories with well developed characters.’ Suzanne

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ ‘I would recommend this to lovers of mysteries.’ Caroline

⭐⭐⭐⭐ ‘A captivating set of central and peripheral characters in tales of murder deftly told by a master storyteller.’ Michael H

MEET THE DETECTIVES
DETECTIVE INSPECTOR JOHN McLEISH may have been brought up in the south of England, but he is very much a Scotsman through and through. Having worked his way up through the ranks of London’s finest, he fervently believes that the Met, like the armies at Waterloo, could not function without the Scots in its ranks. Standing at six feet four — and with the physique of a rugby forward — he cuts a striking figure, but is every inch the gentleman.

Bright young FRANCESCA WILSON worked her way up through the man’s world of the civil service to become a much-respected figure in the Department of Trade and Industry. But don’t be fooled by her dazzling eyes and snappy haircut — her sharp mind and photographic memory mean she is more than a match for her male counterparts. And, as those close to her know, she cut her teeth taking care of four younger brothers from the age of ten, who still continually get into scrapes.