Story Crisis, Story Climax 1: How to Give Your Fiction or Screenplay Forward Momentum

| November 14, 2014

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Story Crisis, Story Climax 1: How to Give Your Fiction or Screenplay Forward Momentum + Story Rhythm Through Character Decisions and Plot Reversals (Crisis Climax)

Story Crisis, Story Climax 1: How to Give Your Fiction or Screenplay Forward Momentum + Story Rhythm Through Character Decisions and Plot Reversals

This is a thorough, detailed, and informative exploration of story. It’s also just plain fun!

Re-live one popular movie story after another!

You’ll see how a screenwriter or novelist knits together an inciting incident, turning points, and the closing crisis decision and climax. Each time this dance of story elements is revealed it becomes clearer how raw events get arranged into a story.

Why spend years learning by trial and error?

Accelerate your learning curve by watching these key elements at work in a range of stories. As a back-end story developer you’ll see the elements in relationship to each other, the story itself, and others of its genre. Crack the storytelling code.

You’ll discover:

* How to harness events to an Inciting Incident early on that crystallizes the one new problem confronting the hero.

* How to guide your characters into theme-tied decisions that cluster into a turning point.

* How to enhance the Midpoint’s coverage of theme, by providing a vivid contrast in attitudes and tone before and after that point.

* How to layer in what’s expected and escalate beyond that in the Crisis Decision, embedding resistance in your hero’s response.

* How to unfold the events of the Climax so they reveal much about the characters, encapsulating and surpassing what the verbal conflicts already highlighted up to that point.

* How to invest in your story’s Climax a test as much for everyone around the hero as for the hero herself.

Writing this deepened my own understanding of story process, and led to completing my first novel not long after.

Novelists, screenwriters, and enthusiasts of story in all its forms stand to benefit from this fun how-to look at the storytelling craft.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

What if I could show you how to make your plots dynamic and your characters scary-real?

HOLLYWOOD SCREENWRITING

There is one element that keeps the escalating Turning Points on track in your story

ACTION/ADVENTURE GENRE

The one scene no action story can be without …

National Treasure (2004)

Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (2004)

Flightplan (2005)

Sahara (2005)

Red Eye (2005)

16 Blocks (2006)

Blood Diamond (2006)

The Day After Tomorrow (2004)

DRAMA GENRE

The only form of drama left standing …

In Good Company (2004)

Man On Fire (2004)

Shall We Dance (2004)

Assault on Precinct 13 (2005)

Derailed (2005)

Eastern Promises (2007)

Vantage Point (2008)

HORROR GENRE

How to show an apocalypse of loss …

28 Days Later (2003)

28 Weeks Later (2007)

Constantine (2005)

The Ring Two (2005)

White Noise (2005)

I Am Legend (2007)

COMEDY GENRE

When a story leads from error to good sense

Secondhand Lions (2003)

Meet the Fockers (2004)

Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous (2005)

Dan in Real Life (2007)The Game Plan (2007)

Surf’s Up (2007)

Underdog (2008)

HISTORICAL GENRE

To show the past is to create a different world

Apocalypto (2006)

The Last Samurai (2003)

Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003)

Seraphim Falls (2006)

Pathfinder (2007)

The Kingdom of Heaven (2005)

SCIENCE FICTION GENRE

What if the future happened differently?

Equilibrium (2002)

Paycheck (2003)

The Jacket (2004)

I, Robot (2005)

Alien vs. Predator: Requiem (2007)

Cloverfield (2008)

FANTASY GENRE

What’s missing from every modern world?

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002)

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (2012)

What the Writer Does

Dedication

About the Author

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