Wordzo – Everyday Words And Their Interesting Stories

| November 27, 2014

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Wordzo - Everyday Words And Their Interesting Stories: Learn new words by reading stories about them

WordZo is a collection of interesting short stories. (Unboastingly) Stories you have never heard of, engaging ones that sure will keep your fingers irresistibly scrolling till the last page. For the ease of consumption, the book is sliced in to sections that holds a bunch of similar, connected words and their original root word and the story to it.

Besides engaging stories, WordZo personifies derived words from each root word in a perspective that will keep you reading with no road-blocks ahead.

Here’s a random excerpt picked by a reader:

From the root word Ducere/Duc/Duct-

“England got her first Duke in 1337. The English monarch, Edward III created the Dukedom of Cornwall for his son who was then just seven years old. The people of England must have wondered whether the little boy would live up to his grand title. After all, the word Duke is derived from the Latin `ducere’ which means to ‘lead’. Happily enough, England’s first Duke did grow up to be one of her greatest military heroes. The Duke of Cornwall, also known as Edward the Black Prince, led the country to some of her biggest victories in the Hundred Years War against the French.

The Latin ‘ducere’, ‘dux’, ‘duct’ which means to ‘lead’ are the root for words like education, introduction, seduction and production.

When you are being educated, you are being led to gain more knowledge. Similarly, when you introduce yourself to somebody, you expect that it will lead you to know the other person better. But when you seduce somebody, you may be leading them on the wrong path. Or you may be hoping that you can lead them to do what you want. Deduction is yet another word that is derived from ducere. When information or facts leads you to draw a particular conclusion, you have used your powers of deduction.”

But WordZo is not only about stories and word perspectives. There’s a learning side to the book. A distinct vocabulary improvement approach that helps you memorise and recollect new words easy.

Here’s how:

What makes learning new words fun? And simple? And fun, again?

Want a simple answer? Wordzo! This book will familiarize you with a whole new way of developing your vocabulary. Rest assured, this won’t be just another ‘English textbook’ that you ‘have to’ read, but you ‘want to’! Just in case you are wondering: No, it doesn’t involve you spending long hours mugging up terms from those dreadfully boring word lists. Turns out, that isn’t the right way to learn after all!

That English is nothing but a long list of words borrowed from cultures around the world, is no news. The interesting part though, is that the root forms of a good portion of these words are the same. Here’s an example to make sense of this. Words like edict, interdict, predict and contradict share a similar root form in ‘dict’. What Wordzo does is familiarize you with such root forms and ‘save’ the words derived from them to your long-term memory (LTM). The idea being that familiarizing yourselves with the root form will help you easily relate to a bigger cache of words that you are having a hard time learning the conventional way.

Now, while simplifying vocabulary building that Wordzo promises to do, to merely describe this book as another dull dictionary-esque manual on your route to mastering this beautiful language, would be wrong. Even as the central theme revolves around word roots and their derivatives, the seamless narration it comes packaged in doesn’t go unnoticed. The relative ease with which the narrator flits between different word derivatives even as he provides a complete context for each of it, is the true glue that has you sticking around for more. Suffice to say, the book is a far cry from the usual, and is a real page-turner. One that will keep you hooked all the way to the end. And unlike flash cards and word lists, you won’t have to keep revisiting this book to refresh your word memory. There, that’s some real incentive to read this!

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