Bird of Prey

| January 14, 2017

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Is life fair? Does everyone get what they deserve? A black back social comedy set in post Brexit Britain. A giant seagull in a seaside town takes a dislike to cats and embarks on a killing spree. The local cats don’t feel very good about this and neither do the public. The bird’s natural instincts are used to great effect to wreak destruction upon the cat population of a seaside town.

Pressure mounts from the media, upon the local authorities, but can the squashed and battered public servants deliver what the public want? The recession bites, and the uncertainty of Brexit means that resources are scarce and sacrifices have to be made by everyone. PCs Franklin (heroine) and Wilkins (idiot) follow the clues left by YouTube to catch the culprit. Under the oppression of sexism, police brutality and bullying the pair use their incredible powers of deduction to solve the crime. Should British police be armed?

Kids are blamed for the crime, during a break up of a friendship made difficult by hereditary pain and internet porn. This adds to one of the kid’s growing pains and the struggle through his adolescent journey, unable to keep his friends.

A beautiful but brilliant Abyssinian cat called Joseph inadvertently discovers the cause of the murders and works on a way to bring his own kind of justice to stop the killings. Revenge and hatred ensues.

Mrs Crick feels the effects of nature’s cruelty as the murdering bird’s home is on top of her bungalow, where the bird lives with his family. She loves wildlife but it can shock and scare sometimes. Mrs Crick has hidden strengths due to buried family tragedy.

Most species try to protect their family but nature is cruel and DNA adapts slowly to cope with changes but some things change quicker than others, a tale of families and bitter rivalries that lead most of them to the wrong conclusions.

Set in a retirement town; Bexhill-on-sea, a place the elderly flock to from around the country to live out the remainder of their lives. Love, child abuse and paedophilia, taboos, this little novel has it all.

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