Suicide Cop

Rashid has a side hustle; he rescues suicidal teens he meets online. Ava jumps from one bad relationship to another, damaging her already fragile self esteem. When the two meet and fall in love, will it be enough to save her?

Meet Gretchen Lovett

I’ve always wanted to write for a living. In fifth grade, I discovered the Song of the Lioness Trilogy, and I was hooked on reading forever after. I passed up the opportunity to pursue English in college because I thought I writing was a hobby rather than a career. “Don’t quit your day job,” and all that. Recently (in no small part due to COVID) I did quit my day job, and began applying to writing gigs full time. I dove into ghostwriting and grant writing and copywriting, anything that involved sitting at the computer and thinking of words. While I still do some of all of that, my true passion is novel writing.

Spies Never Quit

If the only way to save her mother is to act like a spy, Mari can act like a spy. 

Maybe.

After her mother is abducted, Mari Sandoval breaks into her mother’s research lab in an ill-advised attempt to appease the kidnappers. Fortunately she’s thwarted by two spunky sorority girls who offer her a better way to save her mother—become a spy. 

In the fast-paced world of undercover agents—where fabulous new clothes, high-tech gadgets, and flirting for secrets are the norm—Mari’s inexperience could ruin everything. 

Will she be able to master the art of espionage in time to rescue her mother from the clutches of a maniac? Or will her undercover mission doom them both to imprisonment?
Click Look Inside to check out Spies Never Quit, a cute spy-thriller where the romance is sweet and the suspense is cozy.


Meet M Taylor Christensen

Myles Christensen writes cozy thriller/suspense with sweet romance under the pen name M. Taylor Christensen.

He loves to write exciting adventures because he loves to read exciting adventures. The hopeless romantic in him can’t resist adding those fun moments of kissing tension (sorry, readers). While writing, he listens to music that matches—and sometimes inspires—the storyline.

His mild-mannered alter ego is a product development engineer, university professor, and game inventor. He lives in Utah with his wife and children.

Bell Hammers

PRANKS. OIL. PROTEST. JOKES BETWEEN NEWLYWEDS. AND ONE HILARIOUS SIEGE OF A MAJOR CORPORATION.

Remmy grows up with Beth in Bellhammer, Illinois as oil and coal companies rob the land of everything that made it paradise. Under his Grandad, he learns how to properly prank his neighbors, friends, and foes. Beth tries to fix Remmy by taking him to church. Under his Daddy, Remmy starts the Bell Hammer Construction Company, which depends on contracts from Texarco Oil. And Beth argues with him about how to build a better business. Together, Remmy and Beth start to build a great neighborhood of “merry men” carpenters: a paradise of s’mores, porch furniture, newborn babies, and summer trips to Branson where their boys pop the tops of off the neighborhood’s two hundred soda bottles. Their witty banter builds a kind of castle among a growing nostalgia.

Then one of Jim Johnstone’s faulty Texarco oil derricks falls down on their house and poisons their neighborhood’s well.

Poisoned wells escalate to torched dog houses. Torched dog houses escalate to stolen carpentry tools and cancelled contracts. Cancelled contracts escalate to eminent domain. Sick of the attacks from Texaco Oil on his neighborhood, Remmy assembles his merry men:

“We need the world’s greatest prank. One grand glorious jest that’ll bloody the nose of that tyrant. Besides, pranks and jokes don’t got no consequences, right?”

:: PRAISE FOR LANCELOT SCHAUBERT AND BELL HAMMERS ::

“Schaubert recounts a mischievous man’s eight decades in Illinois’s Little Egypt region in his picaresque debut. Remmy’s life of constant schemes and pranks and a lifelong feud with classmate Jim Johnstone and the local oil drilling company proves consequential. This is a hoot.” 

— Publisher’s Weekly

“BELL HAMMERS is written in a style not unworthy of John Kennedy Toole and William Faulkner – the vivid characterization of Southern ethnography commingled with stark, episodic spectacle breathes with the spirit of quintessential Americana. It is a text I would happily assign in an American Novel class and would expect it to yield satisfying discourse alongside works in the canon, whether beside the sardonic prose of Mark Twain or the energetically painful narratives of Toni Morrison.”

— Dr. Anthony Cirilla

“Schaubert’s words have an immediacy, a potency, an intimacy that grab the reader by the collar and say, ‘Listen, this is important!’ Probing the bones and gristle of humanity, Lancelot’s subjects challenge, but also offer insights into redemption if only we will stop and pay attention.”

— Erika Robuck, national bestselling author of Hemingway’s Girl

“Myth, regret, the lore of our heritage and the subtle displays of our castes — no one so accurately and imaginatively captures the joys and sorrows of life in the Midwest as Schaubert does here. BELL HAMMERS is a Tree Grows in Brooklyn as told by Gabriel Garcia Marquez if Marquez lived in rural Illinois and only told stories to his grandkids. Seriously a delight to read.”

— Colby Williams, author of the Axiom Gold Medal winning book Small Town, Big Money

“Loved BELL HAMMERS because Lancelot wrote about people who don’t get written about enough and he did it with humor, compassion, and heart.”

— Brian Slatterly, author of Lost Everything and editor of The New Haven Review

“I’m such a fan of Lancelot Schaubert’s work. His unique view and his life-wisdom enriches all he does. We’re lucky to count him among our contributors.”

— Therese Walsh, author of The Moon Sisters and Editorial Director of Writer Unboxed


Meet Lancelot Schaubert

Two excerpts of Lancelot Schaubert’s (lanceschaubert.org) debut novel BELL HAMMERS sold to The New Haven Review ( Yale’s Institute Library ) and The Misty Review, while a third excerpt was selected as a finalist for the last Glimmer Train Fiction Open in history. He has also sold poetry, fiction, and nonfiction to TOR (MacMillan), The Anglican Theological Review, McSweeney’s, Poker Pro’s World Series Edition, The Poet’s Market, Writer’s Digest, and many similar markets.

Spark + Echo chose him for their 2019 artist in residency, commissioning him to write four short stories.

He has published work in anthologies like Author in Progress, Harry Potter for Nerds, and Of Gods and Globes — the last of which he edited and featured stories by Juliet Marillier (whose story was nominated for an Aurealis award), Anne Greenwood Brown, Dr. Anthony Cirilla, LJ Cohen, FC Shultz, and Emily Munro. His work Cold Brewed reinvented the photonovel for the digital age and caught the attention of the Missouri Tourism Board who commissioned him to write and direct a second photonovel, The Joplin Undercurrent, in partnership with award-winning photographer, Mark Neuenschwander.

He remains a committed husband to the grooviest girl on earth and is a public advocate for more free range trees. You know, Ents.

The Ticket

Tray Dunaway, an ordinary teenager from a poor Southern family, longs to become part of the popular clique at school. Her mother, Evelyn, lies in bed most days with her bipolar tendency toward extreme highs or desperate lows. Meanwhile, Tray’s grandmother Ginny, still grieving over the loss of her husband, would love to move out and find a place of her own. Maybe even a bit of romance to replace the loss she feels. But given the sorry state of the family’s finances that’s not possible.

Then the Dunaways’ luck changes. Or so it seems.

Tray’s father drives a down-and-out friend of the family, Pee Wee Johnson, to Hazard, Illinois, so Johnson can buy lottery tickets. As a gesture of thanks, Johnson gives a ticket to Tray’s father. And what do you know? The Dunaways’ are suddenly rich.

When Johnson demands his cut of the winnings, Tray’s dad refuses. As Evelyn’s illness spirals toward madness, Johnson threatens the family. Now, what seems like a stroke of good fortune becomes a dangerous game of life and death for Tray Dunaway and her family.

Meet Debra Coleman Jeter

Debra Coleman Jeter has published both fiction and nonfiction in popular magazines, including Working Woman, New Woman, Self, Home Life, Savvy, Christian Woman, and American Baby. Her first novel, The Ticket, was a finalist for a Selah Award, as well as for Jerry Jenkins’ Operation First Novel. Her story, “Recovery,” was awarded first prize in a short story competition sponsored by Christian Woman; and her nonfiction book “Pshaw, It’s Me Grandson”: Tales of a Young Actor was a finalist in the USA Book News Awards. She is a co-writer of the screenplay for Jess + Moss, a feature film which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, screened at nearly forty film festivals around the world, and captured several domestic and international awards.

Axiom

Death and violence do not exist in Axiom. There is no strife, no war, no suffering. There is no hunger, no sadness, and no pain. Axiom is a place of perfection. But, at what cost?In Axiom, mankind has willingly submitted itself to one man–the Lord Protector–who controls the destiny of every human being. Emotions have become outlawed. Relationships are forbidden. Any sign of the Disease is treated with hostility. Under the eternal guidance of the Lord Protector, mankind no longer knows what it means to be human. But, stirring within the hearts and minds of a few individuals is a reality which cannot be ignored. It is this reality which will cause the spark of rebellion to be born.

Meet Kristofor Hellmeister

About Me
I’m an alien–a legal alien. I was born in Canada but have since moved all the way to a small town near Atlanta, GA. I live with my beautiful wife, Kristie, and my son, Maddox.

I enjoy reading science fiction, historical fiction, fantasy, military fiction, and nonfiction–especially history or leadership focused. When I’m not writing or reading, I am outside taming my backyard, or golfing with my brothers, or going for a run. I am a teacher, but can honestly say that teaching never feels like a job.

I hope you enjoy my writing! I would love to hear from you, the reader, and hope to join you in this journey of experiencing story.

The Community: the best days of our lives

#1 best-seller of the Atlantis Times, Sodom and Gomorrah Today, and Pompei Post

Did you ever look at your parents when they got back from work and thought, “there’s no way I’m going to end up like this?” Did you ever look around you and felt disgusted by the things people look up to? Did you ever ask yourself, “that’s it? That’s life?” Well, so did they! Elton, Donna, Carole, John, Rick, Woody, and Michelle are utterly different young people who asked themselves these very questions? What did they do about it? Left everything behind and formed a community? Did it solve everything? Did it work? Read and find out!

BEST BOOK I’VE EVER READ!” Mom

“I’M NOT REALLY INTO BOOKS, BUT IF OTHER BOOKS ARE HALF AS GOOD AS THIS ONE, THEN I’D BETTER START READING!” Zoey, Sean’s twin sister

“IF I WERE AN ASTRONAUT AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE GIFT I COULD GRANT AN ALIEN, IT’D HAVE BEEN THIS BOOK!” Dad

“THE BEST BOOK TO COME OUT SINCE A TALE OF TWO CITIES! TRUST ME; I WAS A BETA READER FOR BOTH ” Grandpa

“WHEN GUTENBERG CAME UP WITH THE FIRST PRINTER HE TOLD ME, ‘there will come a day when your grand-grand-grand-grandson will publish a book so good it’d make all my hard work worthwhile!’” the only paragraph to survive from Sean’s great-great-great-great grandmother’s diary; circa 1450.


Meet Sean Bloom

Sean Bloom has always been an avid lier, so, naturally, the next step for him was writing books.
His first book, The Community, is out now and has already been praised as the greatest book of all time by his immediate family and friends.
When he’s not writing–which he would’ve loved to do ALL THE TIME–and not reading, Sean likes to root for soccer teams that always disappoint their fans, spy after his dogs to see if they possess super-powers they keep as a secret from him and exercise (in eating ice-cream).

Despite his belief, Sean does NOT live in an attic by the Seine, but several big apparel retailers offer a bounty for his head–they claim he’s constantly stretching clothes then putting them back on the rack–so he won’t disclose where he lives.

Shockingly, Sean is single (offers are most welcome), but he finds comfort in reading about characters with worse fates.