Bored on the Wild Side: Memories, Observations, and Misadventures

Forty five years of stumbling, bumbling, and striving to make the American dream a reality. Beginning in the mid-1970s and hitting the brakes days before the 2020 elections, this compelling memoir shows us where we’ve been and where we might be headed via one man’s memories and experiences.
While it may read like a novel, every word is true: good, bad, and ugly.
Talk is cheap and some actions have expensive consequences. What’s worse? Regretting some of the things you’ve done, or wondering what might have been? Do you have the guts to chase your crazy dreams and live up to your highest ideals, or are your convictions as shallow as the ink on your T-shirt?
Filled with interesting characters, uncommon adventures, and gallows humor throughout, this is the tale of an individual who played it to the hilt until he was bored. Bored on the wild side.


Meet Jason Laureno

Jason Laureno is an irrepressible smartass and a terminal fuckup, but he means well. He lives in one of the worst neighborhoods in Gresham, Oregon and he absolutely loves it. He bites his fingernails, picks his nose, and farts a lot. He is enjoying a few beers while he writes this, as he feels pretentious writing about himself in the third person.

Blood on Their Hands: Weaving a Tangled Web

A racist attorney faces a crisis of conscience when reluctantly defending a black man brutally beaten by police and charged with resisting arrest.


Hiram Garbuncle is a veteran criminal defense attorney—as well as a racist, miserly alcoholic. His life revolves around hoarding money, following sports, pursuing sex, drinking—and the prideful practice of law.


Alec Monceau is a black man working to support his daughter’s family in Trinidad. It is 2008, and his car carries an Obama bumper sticker. This political advertisement leads to a superfluous traffic stop and a brutal beating by police.


It goes against Garbuncle’s grain to defend a black man from a charge of violently resisting arrest, but he is so confident of winning that he is negligent in the jury selection, and a mistrial occurs. He then discovers incriminating evidence on the two cops, and his new challenge becomes how to keep himself and his client alive pending a new trial.


Meet Bob Brink

Bob Brink is a journalist who worked with several large newspaper organizations and a group of magazines. His byline has been on thousands of news stories, features, and entertainment reviews.
He now is embarked on authoring books. His newest book, the legal thriller Blood on Their Hands, follows Murder in Palm Beach: The Homicide That Never Died, a roman à clef about a real, sensational 1976 murder that made headlines for 15 years, and recently made news again with a new development in the case. The book became an Amazon best seller.
His other books are: Breaking Out, a coming-of-age novel, The Way We Were: Short Stories and Tall Tales, and A Tale of Two Continents, a ghost-written memoir. He is working on a book of creative nonfiction about a woman who led an incredible life of crime.
Brink has won numerous writing accolades and several awards, including three for Palm Beach Illustrated, which won the Best Written Magazine award from the Florida Magazine Association after he became copy chief and writer.
Besides dabbling in short-story writing over the years, Brink immersed himself in learning to play the clarinet and tenor saxophone. He performed many years with an estimable, 65-piece community symphonic band, and played a few professional big band gigs.
A product of Michigan and Iowa, Brink has a bachelor’s degree in English and German from Drake University in Des Moines and completed graduate journalism studies at the University of Iowa.