The Sun God’s Heir: Return (Book One)

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René Gilbert awoke shackled to the wall of a four-foot-high ship’s slave hold.

The filthy bilgewater splashed over his head and then receded. Under sail.

The North Atlantic, 1672. To survive, René must escape a slave ship in the midst of the ocean.

Focus on the first thing, his fencing master’s voice rose from within his memory.

“Don’t drown,” he thought. His second thought was the memory of a wooden rod speeding toward him for his sarcasm.

Rapier sharp pulse pounding action across the warp and weave of the seventeenth century. Sailing ships, pirates, and past lives contend in this first book of an award-winning trilogy.

Read The Sun God’s Heir: Return (Book One) and set sail into a time where love and life were precious and easily taken away. Where the distance to one’s enemies was measured by the length of a rapier’s blade.

Alexandre Dumas meets Horatio Hornblower and The Mummy in this sweeping, swashbuckling tale.    Kirkus Reviews

The Sun God’s Heir: Return, is an epic story, taking you into a time where actions and words ripple from the past into the present and then invade the future. A truly remarkable story.    Readers Favorite

In this epic fantasy, THE SUN GOD’S HEIR by Elliott Baker, readers are offered a unique and compelling story line. Baker’s vivid descriptions and well-drawn characters seem to shimmer with life.   Judge, 25th Annual Writer’s Digest Self-Published Book Awards.

The Way is a River of Stars

The Way is a River of Stars - ASIN B00D2MEG1M

In a memoir of saints, sages, and swollen ankles, Helen walks across the Catholic heartland of Northern Spain. Her chosen route is the picturesque Camino Way, a Christian pilgrimage revered since medieval times. Ancient towns and villages, each with a distinct culture and cuisine, mark the way.

Memories and miles intertwine, spanning not only the countryside but also her Christian upbringing and later life as a Buddhist. What is it that compels her into the cathedrals and rustic churches she finds during her month-long journey?

‘Just as I walked from Roncesvalles to Santiago de Compostela – a different woman now to the one who began – I also travelled from one religion to another. Perhaps I put on pilgrim boots to better understand the message of each – the verbs of their prayers – what it means to engage with life, the joys of aloneness and the delights of company.’

Through recollections of meditation retreats, monasteries in Burma and encounters with the gilded Saints and Madonnas of Spanish cathedrals, Helen contemplates the heart of two religions, in her quest for deeper meanings that can unite us all.