Snapshots of Ireland Volume 4 Travels in Galway

The second largest county in Ireland, Galway is known for its magnificent bay, one of the most enchanting and vibrant medieval cities in Europe, and the storied Aran Islands. Scrumptious sea and mountain panoramas, dotted with sheep, rows of peat and Connemara ponies contribute to making Galway a primary destination along the Wild Atlantic Way.

The interior of the county is equally spectacular. The renowned Connemara National Park, The Twelve Bens, and Lough Corrib only begin the list of places, sites and sights that make this an Irish county second to none.

A good share of the county is in the Gaeltacht (Irish speaking area) where tradition is highly valued and Celtic spirit prevails.
Festival and special events abound. Some, like the Galway Oyster Festival, the Omey Pony Races, or the Red-sail Hooker Races are unique. If you a traveling to Galway, check the schedule to partake (or avoid) what is on offer each weekend.

Meet Jeanne Crane

Sharing Celtic Spirituality and Celtic Wisdom through writing blogs and books what I love to do. I also enjoy sharing Celtic teachings through speaking engagements including festivals and book clubs.
My first trip to Ireland was as a teenager. I immediately felt a deep connection to my Celtic roots. But it was on a much later trip that I was introduced to the ancient sites, the dolmens, stone circles and beehive structures that have captivated me. These thin places stir me beyond any cathedral, temple or sacred site I have ever visited. Each trip I take to Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Cornwall or the Isle of Mann deeps my connection to the mystery and wonder of our amazing Universe.

Snapshots of Ireland Volume 2 Travels in Kerry

The Irish jaunting car gave horse-drawn rides through its famous Ring of Kerry long before the invention of automobiles. Buses, then luxury tour coaches followed. Now, Dingle has also become a destination of choice to thousands more. The third Kerry peninsula, Beara, is its hidden gem. All are part of the Wild Atlantic Way, the branding term for the magnificent coast line of western Ireland. Each is spectacular. Kerry has beautiful mountains, with picturesque manors and castles on the bluest of lakes tucked between; coastal vistas from dolphins of Dingle Bay to the monastic ruins on rocky Skellig Islands; and charming towns offering festivals, music and sport. I first visited Kerry in 1971 with my parents, traveling around the Ring of Kerry in early June when the wild rhododendrons blazed against the old stone walls along both sides of the road. Even back then, stone walls were being torn down to widen the road for tour buses. It is heart-breaking to think of what has been lost. Fortunately, some brakes have been exercised so that once the traveler is beyond the Killarney Lakes area, the charm of small villages, and a Gaeltacht (Irish-speaking/old ways) area can still be found.

Meet Jeanne Crane

Sharing Celtic Spirituality and Celtic Wisdom through writing blogs and books what I love to do. I also enjoy sharing Celtic teachings through speaking engagements including festivals and book clubs. My first trip to Ireland was as a teenager. I immediately felt a deep connection to my Celtic roots. But it was on a much later trip that I was introduced to the ancient sites, the dolmens, stone circles and beehive structures that have captivated me. These thin places stir me beyond any cathedral, temple or sacred site I have ever visited. Each trip I take to Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Cornwall or the Isle of Mann deeps my connection to the mystery and wonder of our amazing Universe.