Diet for Great Sex: Food for Male and Female Sexual Health

As Featured In: -Huffington Post -Marie Claire -cbs -Daily Mail -The Sun “A comprehensive, valuable, enjoyable, and potentially society-enhancing resource on how to enjoy mutually magnificent sex regularly and naturally.” -Indie Reader Hot Sex, naturally? Sex truly becomes great when our nerves, blood vessels and hormones operate in synchrony. Luckily, modern research has shown that diet affects this trifecta, and having a great sex life might just be as easy as preparing the right dinner. In Diet for Great Sex, author Christine DeLozier, L.Ac. explains how the foods we eat can balance hormones, increase blood flow and strengthen nerve conduction to and from the genitals. Calling upon her years of experience treating sexual health issues, and her training as a research scientist, DeLozier walks readers through the specific foods that will lead to great sex and explains the science of how it works. When our bodies are well-nourished, desire comes naturally, pleasure comes naturally, and orgasm is effortless. Isn’t it time you unlock the secret to eating for sexual pleasure? • “Top sexual therapist reveals the sizzling sex diet that will make you fall in love all over again.” – Daily Mail • “Packed with easy-to-navigate advice along with delicious food ideas, as well as no-nonsense tips on how to bring out the best passion in a ho-hum intimate encounter.” – Toronto Sun


Meet Christine DeLozier

My name is Christine DeLozier, author of the book, Diet for Great Sex: Food for Male and Female Sexual Health. I am a licensed acupuncturist in private practice specializing in sexual health. A lover of nature and of food, I strive to cook delicious, beautiful and healthy food for myself and my family. Having a science background, I love learning about how food affects every aspect of human health. I have 4 kids, live in NY and love to ride my bike.

Fine, Thanks

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Mary Dunnewold was a yoga-practicing, organic-food-eating health geek. But six months after a clear mammogram, she was diagnosed with stage-three breast cancer. She had six tumors. The largest was the size of a summer plum.

In the next two years, she endured a bilateral mastectomy, chemotherapy, radiation, and multiple reconstruction procedures. But she soon learned that navigating cancer involves more than suffering through the treatment gauntlet. How do you walk the aisles of a small-town Target, guilty of having cancer in public, wondering who knows and who doesn’t? Where do you look when the handsome plastic surgeon kneels in front of you to measure your body fat? What etiquette applies when, during a dinner party, your chest splits open like an overripe watermelon?

In this memoir, the author moves from needing a reason to explain her troubles to finding meaning despite the randomness that afflicts us all.

Semmelweis, the Women’s Doctor

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The Life and Work of pioneering physician Ignaz P. Semmelweis, who discovered the causes and means of prevention of childbed fever, the H.I.V. and cancer of his day. Called the “Father of Antisepsis,” he was largely ignored, placed in an asylum and murdered. He was a man who did good for women.

“His life was a beneficial example for all mankind.” Kurt Vonnegut

“To be sure, Semmelweis was a pioneering physician and scientist whose accomplishments should be studied for their contributions to science. But he was also a feminist, and his work should be understood in that vein, also.”–Ellen Nerenberg, Hollis Professor of Romance Languages & Literatures, Wesleyan University

Looking at and understanding someone like Semmelweis on a deep level and how he combated prejudices and prevailing thoughts and changed the way medicine is practiced is as relevant today as it was in the 1840s.—
Prakash Sampath, M.D. President, Rhode Island Neurological Institute.

From the author: … the hope is that today, around the world, at this moment, when one is passing surely one of millions of hand sanitizers and uses it to cleanse the hands, a thought can possibly go out to Dr. Ignaz Semmelweis and a fuller understanding, and appreciation, of his life and work.

Critics are saying: “Inspirational and very well written.”