Rendezvous

D-Day, the most risky invasion of World War II. Sergeant Flanagan and his platoon land with tens of thousands of Allied soldiers on Omaha Beach. Their reward? A suicide mission deep behind D-Day lines. Their mission? Locate a secret German army group which threatens to throw the invasion back into the sea. They fight their way through occupied France and as they near their goal, they realize they have no chance to get out of this alive. Then the real fight begins.

War is Personal. Hell, Luck and Resilience: A WWII Combat Marine’s Accounts of Okinawa and China

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The invasion of Okinawa was one of the bloodiest battles of WWII Pacific. The casualties were monumental. Roy Wilkes, Private, USMC was unfortunate enough to have a front-row seat. He witnessed twenty-three of his friends die in a bombing. True, gripping stories and pictures reveal the mind, heart, and soul of a fighting WWII Marine.


EXCERPTS FROM THE BOOK:


“The grim reaper missed me. The dumb bastard had a close-up swing at me on six different occasions—and missed.”


“The casualties were monumental. Trucks were coming down the lines with Marines piled like cordwood. They put ponchos over ‘em, but you could see all these feet dangling out. It was like a conveyor belt. We were going up and they were coming back. The only difference is we were alive—and they were dead.”




“The Marine Raider [A Raider is a part of the elite special operations force] said, “If another grenade comes in, I’ll take care of it.” And just as he said that another grenade came in. He grabbed his rifle and charged the hill.”




“Continuous rain dampened the soul.
The low, thick dark clouds made sure God didn’t see.
What happened here was a secret from Him.

God was busy someplace else.
So this part of His Universe went insane.”




Semper Fi


This fascinating book is also a perfect history lesson for students since it covers all aspects of the Battle of Okinawa: Mental, emotional, historical, and personal. There are short stories about the war—some tragic, some funny, some thought-provoking—but all true. There are also 54 pictures, two interviews with Roy, and “After the War” pages. This eye witness account gives the complete picture of what World War II was really like and how PTSD was with him till the end of his life.

I justify Hitler

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Even though there is a tons of literature written about the events of the First and Second World Wars, the historians still voice their debates that the true history of the 20th century hasn’t been written yet. Indeed, there are still no meaningful answers to the questions: who unleashed the First World War, why did the October Revolution in Russia happen, what were the true reasons for the Second World War? For these and other questions, the author is trying to find the answers in his book.
Of course, there is absolutely no way to justify the horrors of the war, but a different perspective of the generally held opinions of the historical events allows one to look at this troubling period in European and World history differently and make critical conclusions for the present.
The book is appropriate for a wide audience.


I Only Wanted to Live: The Struggle of a Boy to Survive the Holocaust

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A broad picture of the Holocaust from the point of view of a child

This book is a memoir of a child who is swept into the whirlwind of the Holocaust. The epic history is narrowed down to the struggle of a single boy nicknamed Leosz to survive the war. From age 7 to age 13, he endures all the horrors that the Holocaust brings upon the Jewish people. Life hangs on split-second timing, decision-making in impossibly cruel circumstances, incredible resourcefulness, luck and the help of others, even Germans.

In the Krakow Ghetto, Leosz is saved from three mass deportations to the death camps. He escapes the ghetto, survives for several weeks pretending to be a

Polish street child, and then goes into hiding. Although sentenced to die after being caught, he is instead miraculously reunited with his family in the Plaszow labor camp. A year later, father and son become slave laborers in the Gozen 2 camp in Austria, where his father perishes. Close to death himself, Leosz is finally liberated by the American army on May 5th, 1945.

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